Re: [-empyre-] Baudrillard's ÚnoncÚ...



Is theory to be found today? At best, we are mostly,
embattled with instrumental texts, texts about texts;
but critique seems...lost and losing.

Especially now.

To borrow from Baudrillard, criticism today is mostly
'operational,' like living.  Our era is where the
cloning of life dessicates thought, succeeds thought,
and innoculates against thought like a vaccine.

Cloning let the genie out of the bottle, destroyed
thought's fascination with itself.  Cornered, thought
finds itself like Ryan Gosling in the film
'Stay'...unable to vanish, yet knowing that in its
current form--it must.  Philosophy is a zombie,
seeking sanctuary in Ethics.  Art is lost, seeking
substance in Biology (formerly Nature).  Theory should
be smarter--it should disappear.  Only then, might it
reappear again.  Baudrillard:

"Le destin de la pensée est celui de l?espèce.  Et il
est dans sa limite singulière, c?est-à-dire que la
pensée ne doit jamais dévorer la distance qui la
sépare d?elle-même."

NRIII


--- Aliette <aliette@criticalsecret.org> wrote:

> existential divide --that he quoted very often
> between friends:- in this
> meaning yes, 
> 
> Radical sadness:
> 
> Nietzsche
> 
> Can be the tentative of exceeding Nietzsche as defy
> 
> And now the challenge for theory beyond
> 
> It's great
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On 9/03/07 14:55, "McKenzie Wark"
> <mckenzie.wark@gmail.com> probably wrote:
> 
> > Sylvere Lotringer asked some US-based writers for
> comments for a piece
> > in Le Nouvel Observateur. This is what I sent him
> this morning:
> > 
> > 
> > "For Baudrillard, our faith in the real is one of
> the elementary forms
> > of religious life. While there are plenty of
> 'realist' philosophers,
> > particularly in America, none bother to question
> the reality of the
> > real itself. Baudrillard's thought was not an
> unmasking of the unreal
> > but rather took place outside of the procedure of
> falsification. For
> > him theory was closer to poetry, an operation that
> made nothingness
> > out of the power of the sign. Everything he wrote
> was marked by a
> > radical sadness and yet invariably expressed in
> the happiest of forms.
> > After the foreclosure of so many seemingly
> 'radical' projects, he
> > pursued the last one left to him, a symbolic
> exchange outside of the
> > endless proliferation of indeterminate signs. He
> returned the world to
> > itself exactly as it was given, as an enigma. But
> always at least as a
> > far more elegant and astonishing one."
> > 
> > It seems to me that would now be the challenge for
> theory.
> > 
> > McKenzie Wark
> > _______________________________________________
> > empyre forum
> > empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au
> > http://www.subtle.net/empyre
> > 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> empyre forum
> empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au
> http://www.subtle.net/empyre
> 


Dr. Nicholas Ruiz III
Editor, Kritikos
http://intertheory.org



This archive was generated by a fusion of Pipermail 0.09 (Mailman edition) and MHonArc 2.6.8.