[-empyre-] off topic: where is the -empyre- archive?

Timothy Conway Murray tcm1 at cornell.edu
Thu Oct 25 06:36:16 EST 2012


Hi, everyone, we are developing a new website that will make all of these kinds of links more apparent. Our beta is almost ready but things developed within universities take some time....

Christina, you should be able to access the -empyre- archives at: http://lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au/pipermail/empyre/

All my best,

Tim
Director, Society for the Humanities
Curator, Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art
Professor of Comparative Literature and English
A. D. White House
Cornell University
Ithaca, New York. 14853
________________________________________
From: empyre-bounces at lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au [empyre-bounces at lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au] on behalf of naxsmash [naxsmash at mac.com]
Sent: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 1:25 PM
To: empyre at lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au
Subject: [-empyre-] off topic: where is the -empyre- archive?

I must be missing something, empyreans.... I am trying to refer to the archives for some projects and I cannot find the link to our archives.. Can anyone help with the updated link?

Christina

http:///christinamcphee.net


On Oct 23, 2012, at 6:00 PM, empyre-request at lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au wrote:

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> Today's Topics:
>
>   1.  week four: Pain, Suffering, and Death in the Virtual
>      (Alan Sondheim)
>   2. Re: night sea crossing 3 + 4 (simon)
>   3. comment relating to Johannes'   night sea crossing 4
>      (Alan Sondheim)
>   4. Re: night sea crossing 5 / Pequenas frestas de ficc??o sobre
>      realidade insistente (Johannes Birringer)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Mon, 22 Oct 2012 21:29:30 -0400 (EDT)
> From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
> To: soft_skinned_space <empyre at lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au>
> Subject: [-empyre-]  week four: Pain, Suffering, and Death in the
>       Virtual
> Message-ID: <alpine.NEB.2.00.1210222123440.9090 at panix3.panix.com>
> Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed
>
>
>
> The fourth week of October's -empyre- discussion will start tomorrow,
> continuing with the topic of Pain, Suffering, and Death in the Real and
> Virtual. The guest will be Maria Damon. Her biographical information is
> below. I've followed Maria's work for a long time, and it has always
> amazed me; it has a poetics all its own, brilliant and surprising.
>
> - Alan
>
> Week 4 - Maria Damon (US)
>
> Maria Damon teaches poetry and poetics at the University of Minnesota. She
> is the author of The Dark End of the Street: Margins in American Vanguard
> Poetry and Postliterary America: From Bagel Shop Jazz to Micropoetries,
> co-author of several books of poetry and online projects with mIEKAL aND
> (Literature Nation, Eros/ion, pleasureTEXTpossession, E.n.t.r.a.n.c.e.d)
> and one with Jukka-Pekka Kervinen (Door Marked X), and co-editor, with Ira
> Livingston, of Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader.
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Tue, 23 Oct 2012 13:34:06 +1300
> From: simon <swht at clear.net.nz>
> To: soft_skinned_space <empyre at lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au>
> Subject: Re: [-empyre-] night sea crossing 3 + 4
> Message-ID: <5085E5FE.2040104 at clear.net.nz>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
>
> On 22/10/12 17:10, Alan Sondheim wrote: Celan, an inertness or silence
> that's uncanny.
>
> isn't Celan's speaking 'uncanny'? 'uncanny' is not the word. The word
> will have the smell of almonds and bite like teeth.
>
> But that the word can, is uncanny - can as in a meditation of Nietzsche
> be untimely - can do. Even when it just won't do.
>
> As Adorno said it could, no longer. Perhaps it was this episode more
> than any other post war which caused Celan the greatest anguish.
>
> Beckett's characters, as Deleuze points out, continue when they can no
> longer. Beyond exhaustion. Beyond the exhaustion of language. Which, for
> Deleuze, is also beyond the exhaustion of consciousness. Or is that
> attention?
>
> What struck me in the Abramovic movie was how common pain is. A common
> sense. The habitus you refer to, Alan? And then that there is this
> mirror play of fear on the surface which all too readily succumbs to the
> popular depth of a particular pain.
>
> Speaking personally, I remember reading Canetti and nightmares that
> wouldn't leave about being two-dimensional. The fear grew over many
> years into an outright hostility towards representation particularly
> where the depths summoned up by pain were concerned.
>
> I'm too thin, as David Byrne sings.
>
> I regret the interpretation of Celan that reads his poetry into its
> aporias. With Anne Carson, I think of him as a lapidary writer, incising
> at great effort words into warm stone.
>
> Exhausted. She can't go on. She goes on...
>
> Best,
>
> Simon Taylor
>
> www.squarewhiteworld.com
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Tue, 23 Oct 2012 04:02:28 -0400 (EDT)
> From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
> To: soft_skinned_space <empyre at lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au>
> Subject: [-empyre-] comment relating to Johannes'   night sea crossing
>       4
> Message-ID: <alpine.NEB.2.00.1210230400450.23039 at panix3.panix.com>
> Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; format=flowed; charset=US-ASCII
>
>
> -- I wrote this text for Foofwa d'Imobilite's Involuntaries, which for me
> were part of the inspiration for this month's topic. The Involuntaries
> (with Foofwa, Vea Lucca, and myself) are at
> http://foofwa.com/productions/video/choreiagraphies.html
> and I thought this works in well with Johannes' comments, and issues of
> real/virtual pain and embodiment.
>
> I do hope others will participate with Maria Damon's contributions,
> beginning today.
>
> - Alan
>
> Breaking New Ground
>
> all circumstances are extenuating.
>
> "if you want to understand what they're about, perhaps these works will
> open up the vast chasm of comprehension on the edge of falling apart - I
> can't think of any better pieces in this regard, and, for that matter, in
> the sheer beauty of fractured movement"
>
> works based on choreia, return, withdrawal from broken edges (before one
> is cut) (before the sound loses its grasp) (before one is cut out (of the
> world) (of your acquaintance) (your grasp) (your body) (of your body my
> own)).
>
> how does one write or circumscribe the body of movement within horizons
> defined by mappings of hyperbolic geometry in the circle? the edge isn't
> just asymptotic; from the outside, it's a bad pill. what looks like chance
> is a battlefield; what looks determined is incandescent birth.
>
> "the battlefield is your last chance of being-alive, just as your birth is
> your first-chance of dying."
>
> there are so many things these movements and sounds are not: listing
> narrows sublimity: just look, it's almost drained away. think of dance as
> a draining, symptom as style, medication-technique, how to get out of the
> hospital.
>
> don't follow or recognize avatars, don't follow or recognize symptoms.
> they start with dim memories of body, with landscapes that accompany us,
> we're hounded.
>
> we're hounded by death, but we're also hounded by disease, troubles,
> fevers, forgetfulness, wrath, rage, ecstasy, visions, poverty, money,
> obligations, lovers, ennui, hallucinations, speed, crime, frustration,
> cataclysm, heat, cold, hunger, thirst, nightmares, mutilations, panic,
> neuroses, economies of attention, economies of the body, excretions,
> garbage, wounds, scars, allergic reactions, insect bites, age, bad
> eyesight, bad hearing, shudderings, shiverings, fear, belongings,
> jealousy, loathing, disgust, addictions.
>
> the playing-field of hounding, playing-field of the hounded. one hounds,
> is hounded; the hounded hounds, hounding is hounded.
>
> or like this: playing-field of haunting, of the haunted. one haunts, is
> haunted; the haunted haunts, haunting is haunted. "these texts, they are
> haunted."
>
> if i write this sentence, thus; if i write this sentence beneath or within
> the sign of fever, migraine, incipient diabetes, tumors malign-benign. if
> i write this sentence beneath the symbolic of medication, bandaging,
> radiation treatment, dialysis. if i write this sentence gagged and
> splayed.
>
> if i write this sentence to control you, if i write this sentence under
> your control. the order to work: persevere.
>
> to persevere, endure, maenad-dance of self-devouring, maenad-music of
> self-control. how can that be, except to ensure that the beat is periodic,
> that repetition hungers. the maenad feeds, hungers for repetition,
> desecrates it (the repeat-ing). they passed it on so far down the line
> that gender-sex and sex-gender change. they passed it down farther.
>
> Who were they? Who's haunting us?
>
> text by Alan Sondheim
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Tue, 23 Oct 2012 19:45:17 +0100
> From: Johannes Birringer <Johannes.Birringer at brunel.ac.uk>
> To: soft_skinned_space <empyre at lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au>
> Subject: Re: [-empyre-] night sea crossing 5 / Pequenas frestas de
>       ficc??o sobre realidade insistente
> Message-ID:
>       <DF657B70CB20304DB745D84933F94B1E0253B802DC at v-exmb01.academic.windsor>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> dear soft_skinned all,
>
>>>     Schwarze Milch der Fr?he wir trinken dich nachts  <<
>>> ?wir trinken dich mittags der Tod ist ein Meister aus Deutschland<<
>
> thank you moderators for inviting me here, and i will leave the week now with a feeling of awe, at the responses coming in today, the
> poetic response on what language can or can not do, what Celan offers, offered here by Simon, which made me go back to the "Todesfuge" (Death Fugue)
> back to the words "...he orders us strike up and play for the dance..."  and back to Adorno's strange comment about
> what [poetry? dance?]  is no more, no longer possible after the Holocaust. Yes, it could not longer, and yes it could.
>
> You could be very right in suggesting that pain is very common, a common sense, and yet in the Abramovic movie is is made operatic, absurd in places.  This too, perhaps, is necessary.
>
> I then watched the dance/video work Alan linked:
>
> Choreiagraphies
> Involuntaries 1-7
>
> and it is haunting, strange, awkward, beautiful, intense, in its raw, unadorned, naked distressedness and beauty
> and i also find consolation, humor (in the very odd pairing of Foofwa d?Imobilit? and Vea Lucca,  with Sondheim the stoic musician
> in the middle, to the side, in the back, near; there is an absolute disconventional or an-aesthetic of working at work here, an articulation
> that gets under the skin precisely because it seems as if the (male) body is jerked and dispersed and controlled by something
> or other (not "choreography" for sure), letting is happen and even enjoying it,  while it (in her) begins to have smallest mutations, of the nervous system, and the repetition
> of something that may calm the body down, the fissures under-neath, that may veil the involuntarinesses, allow her to maintain a pose, dressed, or exposed?
>
> thank you for sharing (you once gave me a copy of "Aletsch" and i showed it to the dance students, and they felt very uncomfortable and ill at ease which I took to be a strong affect, Foofwa's
> "dancing" struck then the wrong way......? good)
>
> and what are these small fissures?  (A Brazilian dance group I admire, Cena 11, made a work a few years ago and i can't forget its title: "Pequenas frestas de ficc??o sobre realidade insistente")
>
> I think many of us do address our emotions in our work, of course; I did begin the Brechtian way, distrusting them, of course, growing up in the land where death was master;  & in my own practice recently I hide on occasion also behind concepts and critical visions and retro-subtensions or whatever;
> i will leave not before having mentioned the work we are currently doing with our DAP-Lab, in case you wondered what we are up to, and it was a new project begun last year
> looking back at a time of revolution and what imaginaries are set at play when society is overturned or a political future is prospected, so our ensemble looked at "Victory over the Sun" [1913], the Russian opera,
> and there in that crazy convoluted libretto there is madness and wit, extenuating circumstances, less pain and no death, well, the dying is to be done to the sun, thus to the world, and that is probably quite bad enough
> as a vision of the future, of New Man  (did not Boris Groys later speak of the "total artwork" (Gesamtkunstwerk) of Stalinism?  here it is again, that word, "Gesamtkunstwerk").
>
> an excerpt of our "for the time being" is at:   http:youtu.be/WeAIYCnsDe4
>
> i look forward to Maria Damon's return.
>
> respectfully
> Johannes Birringer
> dap lab
> http://people.brunel.ac.uk/dap/forthetimebeing.html
>
> +++
>
> [Alan schreibt]
>
> -- I wrote this text for Foofwa d'Imobilite's "Involuntaries," which for me
> were part of the inspiration for this month's topic. The Involuntaries
> (with Foofwa, Vea Lucca, and myself) are at
> http://foofwa.com/productions/video/choreiagraphies.html
> and I thought this works in well with Johannes' comments, and issues of
> real/virtual pain and embodiment.
>
> Breaking New Ground
>
> all circumstances are extenuating.
> ....[ ...]
>
> to persevere, endure, maenad-dance of self-devouring, maenad-music of
> self-control. how can that be, except to ensure that the beat is periodic,
> that repetition hungers. the maenad feeds, hungers for repetition,
> desecrates it (the repeat-ing). they passed it on so far down the line
> that gender-sex and sex-gender change. they passed it down farther.
>
> Who were they? Who's haunting us?
>>>>
> _______________________________________________
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
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> empyre at lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au
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>
> End of empyre Digest, Vol 95, Issue 25
> **************************************

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