[-empyre-] Welcome to the November: Documenting Digital Artivism

Patrick Keilty p.keilty at utoronto.ca
Mon Nov 4 01:51:33 EST 2013


Welcome to the November everyone! Selmin, Camilla, and I are thrilled to be
hosting this month's discussion, "Documenting Digital Artivism." We have
guest discussants who work widely across disciplines and from varying
prospectives around the globe. This month we'll hear from curators, new
media artists/ activists, archivists, and scholars from film, media
studies, communications, visual studies, and information studies.

Our first guest discussants are micha cárdenas, Andrew Lau, and Samara
Smith. micha cárdenas is an artist, hackctivist, poet, performer, student,
and educator, mixed-race trans femme Latina survivor who works at the
intersection of movement, technology and politics. micha is a PhD student
in Media Arts and Practice (iMAP), Provost Fellow at University of Southern
California, and a member of the art collective Electronic Disturbance
Theater 2.0. micha’s project, Local Autonomy Networks, was selected for the
2012 ZERO1 Biennial in San Jose and was the subject of three of their
keynote performances. micha’s co-authored book *The Transreal: Political
Aesthetics of Crossing Realities*, was published by Atropos Press in 2012.
In 2013 micha has been a New Directions Scholar at the USC Center for
Feminist Research and a MacArthur Foundation HASTAC Scholar. micha holds an
MFA from University of California, San Diego, an MA in Communication from
the European Graduate School and a BS in Computer Science from Florida
International University. They blog at michacardenas.org and tweet at
@michacardenas <http://twitter.com/michacardenas>



Andrew J. Lau is an archivist and the production lead in the Office of
Instructional
Enhancement at UCLA Extension. He received his PhD in information studies
at UCLA, as well as a master's degree in library and information science
with a specialization in archival studies. Andrew's research interests
include documentation and social practices in contemporary art, community
archival informatics, educational technology, and critical approaches to
information and archival studies. In conjunction with this research agenda,
he is passionate about teaching and instruction both in and out of
educational institutions. Prior to moving to Oakland where he presently
resides, Andrew designed and taught Glendale Community College's first
course on new media and information studies. He has also organized and led
workshops on archives, recordkeeping, and documentation at the California
Institute of the Arts, the Public School Los Angeles, and Southern Exposure.



Samara Smith, a documentary media practitioner and educator, creates
site-specific projects in and about public space.  *Chain
Reaction*<http://hammer.ucla.edu/exhibitions/detail/exhibition_id/229>,
her locative game exploring urban environments, was recently exhibited at
the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. *Anyplace,
Brooklyn*<http://samarasmith.com/archives/203>
*,* her sound walk about urban space and development, was featured at the
Conflux Festival in 2007. She is currently working on a soundwalk
documenting Occupy Wall Street’s transformation of NYC’s Zuccotti
Park.  Samara is also the creative producer of *Experiments: Old Westbury
Oral History Project*, which documents the College’s experimental roots on
an interactive video documentary website.  She has over a decade of
documentary film experience with credits on many award-winning films.
Samara is an Assistant Professor of video and new media at SUNY College at
Old Westbury and holds an MFA in Integrated Media Arts from Hunter College.


So the first few questions we might want to tackle are, what does digital
technology mean for artivism and what makes art an effective form of
activism? These questions stem from a variety of artivist movements Selmin,
Camilla, and I have been discussing lately, primarily in Europe, the U.S.,
Canada, and Turkey (we would love to hear about other instances of digital
artivism). Selmin and I have been particularly interested in the Gezi
protests in Turkey that gave rise to an enormous array of artivism, digital
artivism in particular. We wondered what impact (digital) artivism had on
the current political situation there, and what role digital technologies
played in disseminating artivist practices. At the least, the Gezi protests
and its enormous array of incredibly strategic/ clever artivism exposed to
the West that the Turkish government's image as a model of modern,
moderate, liberal, and democratic Islamism is a complete fabrication. In
trying to understand the process of disseminating Gezi-related artivism, I
began to see the line between dissemination and documentation as an
increasingly blurry one. I wonder whether the process of dissemination
necessarily involves documentary qualities, or is itself a form of
documentation. For to "disseminate" is not just to make something diffuse
but also, as a result of diffusion, to deposit something elsewhere. How
might depositing artivism elsewhere be a form of activism, or is
documentation once again simply claiming art for art history? So those are
some of the questions that immediately pop into my mind as I write this on
the fly in the early morning hours in a hotel room in Montreal (sans
coffee!).


Alongside those questions, let me quote from our original introductory
post, just for a bit of additional context:


This year’s Istanbul’s Biennial, running between Sept 14 - October 20,
2013, took on a peculiar tone after the explosive summer Gezi Park protests
that shook the country. Deutsche Welle reported on Sept 20, 2013 that
Istanbul’s public spaces had been transformed into political forums, with
art and activism spilling into the streets and the vast expanses of the
network, somewhat negating the need for a politically engaged international
art exhibition. Therefore, artists and curators reportedly felt the need to
rethink the purpose of their work according to what was going on in the
streets instead of positioning themselves as the sole catalysts for the
transformation of urban space. The pervasive adoption of art activism and
its documentation-distribution through various media by the masses is of
course not a phenomenon particular to Turkey; social justice movements in
various countries in the past decade (especially protests in Brazil and
Egypt during the summer of 2013) saw the emergence of social media and
digital artivism as a common strategy among the netizens of the world.


I am eager to see how this conversation shapes up. Thank you to our guest
discussants and to Tim and Renate for allowing us to moderate this
discussion on -empyre.





On Sun, Nov 3, 2013 at 8:50 AM, Patrick Keilty <p.keilty at utoronto.ca> wrote:

> *November on –empyre soft-skinned space: Documenting Digital Artivism*
>
>
>
> Moderated by Selmin Kara (Canada), Patrick Keilty (Canada) and Camilla
> Møhring Reestorff (Denmark) with invited discussants Zach Blas (USA),
> Matthew Brower (Canada), micha cárdenas (USA), Sandra Danilovic (Canada),
> Scott Hocking (USA), Andrew Lau (USA), Chaya Litvack (Canada), David
> McIntosh (Canada), Owen Mundy (USA), Samara Smith (USA), and Ebru
> Yetiskin (Turkey).
>
>
>
> Documenting Digital Artivism
>
>
>
> In the process of mediatization, broadly defined as a process in which
> diverse political discourses get communicated and shaped by media (Hjarvard
> 2009, Castells 2009, Hepp 2012), art practices, documentary forms, activism
> and politics get intertwined, prompting the establishment of hybrid fields
> of activity such as “artivism” (art activism), which benefits from the
> expansion of the means of documentation in the age of networks and new
> media. While much has been made of the digital transformations of both art
> and documentation, we don’t typically think of the two together. Perhaps
> this owes to our tendency to link the concepts of “documentation” to
> authority and the presumed neutrality of information and data. Conversely,
> “art” often challenges, critiques, or subverts power, authority and the
> immutability of the document. In this discussion, we want to put into
> critical conversation concepts of documentation, activism, and digital art
> practices in order to understand the ways in which they inform and at times
> sustain each other. Several scholars have touched on different aspects of
> this topic, including Lisa Gitelman, Victoria Vesna, Johanna Drucker, Leah
> Lievrouw, Timothy Murray, Rita Raley, Eugene Thacker, Mark B. N. Hansen,
> Tony D. Sampson, Stig Hjarvard, Jussi Parikka, Boris Groys, and Erkki
> Kurenniemi, to name only a few. The following questions act as a
> provocation to discussion:
>
>
>
> -- What does digital culture -- especially networked culture, information,
> technological apparatus, and database logic -- mean for artivism?
>
> -- How far does it make sense to conceive of artivism and documentary
> forms together or separately?
>
> -- How are artivism and journalism similar/ different?
>
> -- Do new social engagements and political coalitions arise from
> documenting digital artivism? If so, what forms do they take? Are they
> sustainable?
>
> -- What makes art an effective form of activism?
>
> -- Does artivism contain documentary or evidentiary qualities? If so, for
> what purpose?
>
> -- Does activism act as an intermediary between digital art and
> documentation?
>
> -- How does documentation change the representational qualities of
> artivist projects?
>
> -- Does documentation undercut the productive qualities of fleeting or
> ephemeral artivist projects?
>
> -- Who gets to document artivism and for what audience?
>
> -- How might documentation and evidentiary practices be geographically,
> socially, economically, and culturally specific?
>
> -- Does it make sense to talk about activism and artworks or should we
> talk about ‘net-works’?
>
> -- How does mediatization and documentation change the ways in which
> people participate in artivist practices?
>
> -- Does digital artivism have an impact? How do we evaluate artivist
> practices?
>
>
>
> For further provocation, the following contexts and artivist projects,
> which are close to our own research interests, reflect a few examples of
> the intersection of documentation and digital artivism. We hope that
> discussants will take them as an invitation to consider other examples of
> this intersection.
>
> This year’s Istanbul’s Biennial, running between Sept 14 - October 20,
> 2013, took on a peculiar tone after the explosive summer Gezi Park protests
> that shook the country. Deutsche Welle reported on Sept 20, 2013 that
> Istanbul’s public spaces had been transformed into political forums, with
> art and activism spilling into the streets and the vast expanses of the
> network, somewhat negating the need for a politically engaged international
> art exhibition. Therefore, artists and curators reportedly felt the need to
> rethink the purpose of their work according to what was going on in the
> streets instead of positioning themselves as the sole catalysts for the
> transformation of urban space. The pervasive adoption of art activism and
> its documentation-distribution through various media by the masses is of
> course not a phenomenon particular to Turkey; social justice movements in
> various countries in the past decade (especially protests in Brazil and
> Egypt during the summer of 2013) saw the emergence of social media and
> digital artivism as a common strategy among the netizens of the world.
>
>
>
> To mark the 25th anniversary of the creation of the AIDS Memorial Quilt,
> Anne Balsamo collaborated with a team of research-designers to create
> several digital experiences for the <http://quilt2012.org/> Quilt 2012
> events that unfolded in Washington DC from June 27-July 27, 2012, including
> a database of the AIDS Memorial Quilt, designed for mobile devices:
> http://www.aidsquilttouch.org/
>
> Zach Blas’ Facial Weaponization Suite produces forms of protest against
> biometric facial recognition–and the inequalities these technologies
> propagate–by making “collective masks” in community-based workshops that
> are modeled from the aggregated facial data of participants. The masks are
> used for public interventions and performances. One mask, the Fag Face
> Mask, is a response to scientific studies that link determining sexual
> orientation through rapid facial recognition techniques. This mask is
> generated from the biometric facial data of many queer men’s faces,
> resulting in an amorphous mask that cannot be detected by biometric facial
> recognition technologies.
> http://www.zachblas.info/projects/facial-weaponization-suite/
>
>
>
> In Local Autonomy Networks, an artivist project focused on creating
> networks of communication to increase community autonomy and reduce
> violence against various marginalized communities, micha cárdenas and a
> network of artists, hackers, and activists designed a line of mesh
> networked electronic clothing with the goal of building autonomous local
> networks that don’t rely on corporate infrastructure to function, inspired
> by community based, anti-racist, prison abolitionist responses to gendered
> violence. The Autonets garments, when activated, alert everyone in range of
> the the local mesh network who is wearing another autonet garment that
> someone needs help and will indicate that person’s direction and distance.
> http://autonets.org/
>
> In 2012 Chinese artivist Ai Weiwei made an imitation of South Korean PSY’s
> hit Gangnam Style Ai Weiwei’s version Grass Mud Horse Style was removed
> from the Chinese video-sharing site Tuduo by the Chinese authorities but
> initially went viral. It was uploaded on YouTube, broadcast in news media
> around the world, and shared and imitated by artists such as the British
> sculptor Anish Kapoor. Grass Mud Horse Style testifies to the net-worked
> character of artivism. The video only moves from dissent to resistance and
> gains political significance through the actions of others – is becomes
> political when it is censored, circulated and embedded in art institutions.
>
> Following Edward Snowden’s leak on NSA’s surveillance, the organisation
> has been the “victim” of several artivist pranks. Iranian-Dutch filmmaker
> Bahram Sadeghi called NSA claiming to have accidentally deleted an email
> message asking if NSA, famous for its “email storage” could help him get it
> back. Whereas Sadeghi ridicules NSA, Ben Grosser, the creator of ScareMail,
> seeks to disturb NSA’s algorithms. ScareMail attaches texts to the bottoms
> of emails, designed to capture the attention of NSA’s filtering mechanism
> and render these useless. Similarly Jörg Piringer’s project vy2ms serves as
> a challenge to governmental code-crakers, by using enigmatic language and
> mysterious images and diagrams.
>
>
>
>
>
> This month’s November edition of –empyre “Documenting Digital Artivism” is
> moderated by Selmin Kara (Canada), Assistant Professor of Film, Ontario
> College of Design University; Patrick Keilty (Canada), Assistant Professor
> of Information and Sexual Diversity Studies, University of Toronto; and
> Camilla Møhring Reestorff (Denmark), Assistant Professor of Aesthetics
> and Communication, Aarhus University
>
>
>
>
>
> *Week 1:  micha **cárdenas  (USA), Andrew J. Lau (USA), and Samara Smith
> (USA)*
>
>
>
> *micha cárdenas *is an artist, hackctivist, poet, performer, student, and
> educator, mixed-race trans femme Latina survivor who works at the
> intersection of movement, technology and politics. micha is a PhD student
> in Media Arts and Practice (iMAP), Provost Fellow at University of Southern
> California, and a member of the art collective Electronic Disturbance
> Theater 2.0. micha’s project, Local Autonomy Networks, was selected for the
> 2012 ZERO1 Biennial in San Jose and was the subject of three of their
> keynote performances. micha’s co-authored book *The Transreal: Political
> Aesthetics of Crossing Realities*, was published by Atropos Press in
> 2012. In 2013 micha has been a New Directions Scholar at the USC Center for
> Feminist Research and a MacArthur Foundation HASTAC Scholar. micha holds an
> MFA from University of California, San Diego, an MA in Communication from
> the European Graduate School and a BS in Computer Science from Florida
> International University. They blog at michacardenas.org and tweet at
> @michacardenas <http://twitter.com/michacardenas>
>
>
>
> *Andrew J. Lau* is an archivist and the production lead in the Office of Instructional
> Enhancement at UCLA Extension. He received his PhD in information studies
> at UCLA, as well as a master's degree in library and information science
> with a specialization in archival studies. Andrew's research interests
> include documentation and social practices in contemporary art, community
> archival informatics, educational technology, and critical approaches to
> information and archival studies. In conjunction with this research agenda,
> he is passionate about teaching and instruction both in and out of
> educational institutions. Prior to moving to Oakland where he presently
> resides, Andrew designed and taught Glendale Community College's first
> course on new media and information studies. He has also organized and led
> workshops on archives, recordkeeping, and documentation at the California
> Institute of the Arts, the Public School Los Angeles, and Southern Exposure.
>
>
>
> *Samara Smith*, a documentary media practitioner and educator, creates
> site-specific projects in and about public space.  *Chain Reaction*<http://hammer.ucla.edu/exhibitions/detail/exhibition_id/229>,
> her locative game exploring urban environments, was recently exhibited at
> the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. *Anyplace, Brooklyn*<http://samarasmith.com/archives/203>
> *,* her sound walk about urban space and development, was featured at the
> Conflux Festival in 2007. She is currently working on a soundwalk
> documenting Occupy Wall Street’s transformation of NYC’s Zuccotti
> Park.  Samara is also the creative producer of *Experiments: Old Westbury
> Oral History Project*, which documents the College’s experimental roots
> on an interactive video documentary website.  She has over a decade of
> documentary film experience with credits on many award-winning films.
> Samara is an Assistant Professor of video and new media at SUNY College at
> Old Westbury and holds an MFA in Integrated Media Arts from Hunter College.
>
>
>
> *Week 2: Matthew Brower (Canada) and Chaya Litvack (Canada)*
>
>
>
> *Matthew Brower *is Lecturer in Museum Studies in the Faculty of
> Information at the University of Toronto. Curator of *Mieke Bal: Nothing
> is Missing* (University of Toronto Art Centre<http://www.utac.utoronto.ca/past-exhibitions/154-nothing-is-missing>
>  2009); *Gord Peteran: Recent Works* (UTAC<http://www.utac.utoronto.ca/past-exhibitions/173-gord-peteran-recent-works> 2009);
> and *Threatened, Endangered, Extinct* (Open Studio<http://www.openstudio.on.ca/osgallery.html>
>  2014). Co-curator of *The Brothel Without Walls* (UTAC<http://www.utac.utoronto.ca/past-exhibitions/195-the-brothel-without-walls>
>  2010), *Suzy Lake: Political Poetics* (UTAC<http://www.utac.utoronto.ca/past-exhibitions/221-suzy-lake>
>  2011, McIntosh Gallery<http://mcintoshgallery.ca/exhibitions/past/2012.html>
>  2012, MacDonald Stewart Art Centre <http://www.msac.ca/> 2012, Mount
> Saint Vincent University Art Gallery<http://msvuart.ca/index.php?menid=02&mtyp=17&article_id=407&sby=6&sbyk=2012&sbyn=&pin=0>
>  2012, Art Gallery of Peterborough <http://www.agp.on.ca/past2012.php> 2012-13);
> and *Collective Identity │Occupied Spaces *(UTAC<http://www.utac.utoronto.ca/past-exhibitions/262-public-contact-2012>
>  and Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art<http://www.mocca.ca/blog/exhibition/public201/> 2013).
> Author of *Developing Animals: Wildlife and Early American Photography *(University
> of Minnesota Press<http://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/developing-animals>
>  2010).
>
>
>
> *Chaya Litvack* is a second year doctoral student in the Faculty of
> Information at University of Toronto. Her research centres on strategies
> for archiving performance art in order to explore the relationship between
> material techniques, temporality, and historiographical practices. She
> brings performance practices in contact with archival theory with the goal
> of expanding the ways in which archival techniques might foster the
> creation of new approaches to writing performance histories.
>
>
>
> *Week 3: Zach Blas (USA), **Sandra Danilovic (Canada)*, *and David
> McIntosh (Canada)*
>
>
>
> *Zach Blas* is an artist and writer whose work engages technology,
> queerness, and politics. He is the creator of art group Queer Technologies,
> a founding member of The Public School Durham, and a PhD candidate in The
> Graduate Program in Literature, Information Science + Information Studies,
> and Visual Studies at Duke University. Currently, he is producing a body of
> work that responds to technological control and refusals of political
> visibility through tactics of escape, disappearance, illegibility, and
> opacity. One project, Facial Weaponization Suite, produces forms of
> aesthetic resistance against biometric facial recognition by making
> “collective masks” in community-based workshops. http://www.zachblas.info/
>
>
>
> *Sandra Danilovic *is a SSHRC Doctoral Fellow and PhD student in
> Information Studies at University of Toronto. She researches DIY game
> design authorship and experimental and expressive (autobiographical) design
> strategies in non-mainstream digital games. She draws on arts-based
> methods, critical and cultural theory and digital aesthetics to re-imagine
> inclusive game design and accessibility philosophy. Her fine arts
> background in film and mixed media is an important component of her
> professional trajectory. Her semi-autobiographical machinima documentary,
> Second Bodies, won Best Documentary at the New Media Film Festival in San
> Francisco (2010). Her previous documentaries explored immigrant narratives
> set within archival and contemporary contexts; Portrait of a Street: The
> Soul and Spirit of College (2001) and Just Arrived (2004) are one-hour
> documentaries respectively broadcast on PBS and Rogers OMNI
> Television. Currently, her artistic practice involves learning to design
> computer games and game art with Toronto's Dames Making Games (www.dmg.to
> ).
>
>
>
> *David McIntosh* is Professor of Media Studies at OCAD University in
> Toronto, Canada. His primary research fields are: globalization and the
> political-economies of audiovisual spaces; network theories and practices;
> new media narrativity; mobile locative media; game theory; digital
> documents; Latin American media studies; and queer media. He has lived and
> worked extensively in Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Argentina and Peru. His
> critical writing on film, video and new media has been published widely in
> books and periodicals. His recent critical texts have focused on a range of
> art, design and technology subjects including: the work of aboriginal
> visual artist Kent Monkman; art and design methods applied to mobile media;
> and, the role of state policy in mobile media innovation. He has curated
> film, video and new media programs for the Funnel Experimental Film Centre,
> the Toronto International Film Festival, Cinematheque Ontario, the Hot Docs
> Documentary Festival, Nuit Blanche Toronto, the National Gallery of Cuba,
> the National Gallery of Argentina, and the Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de
> Buenos Aires (MALBA). He is an award winning documentary film producer
> (Tina in Mexico, 2002) and dramatic screenwriter (Stryker, 2004). He was
> researcher with two recent OCAD mobile media projects: Mobile Digital
> Commons Network, where he was a Creative Lead and Project Director on the
> cellphone experience The Haunting (2007); and Portage (2007-2008), where he
> developed a range of interactive mobile media applications, including the
> Mobile Media Workshop in a Suitcase (2007). He was artist in residence at
> the Amauta New Media Centre in Cusco, Peru in 2007, where he began research
> and development of a distributed, digital documentary based in mobile media
> uses in the informal economy of Cusco, Peru. In 2010 he completed this
> innovative, multi-screen, multi-platform mobile documentary project in
> Cusco, Peru, titled Qosqo Llika (www.qosqollika.org ). Most recently he
> was awarded a major grant to undertake the new digital media work
> Quipucamayoc, a transmedial, translocal multiplayer game creation with two
> Andean communities that merges interactive public performance/installation
> with a live action gaming platform, and that composits sensor-enhanced
> characters with documentary photographic locative backgrounds in the game
> play. In 2008, McIntosh was the recipient of the prestigious OCAD
> University Award for a Career of Distinguished Research and Creation.
>
>
>
> *Week 4: Scott Hocking (USA), Owen Mundy (USA), and **Ebru Yetiskin
> (Turkey)*
>
>
>
> Based in Detroit, *Scott Hocking *is a multidisciplinary artist whose
> work is dependent upon the forgotten spaces where he practices. He
> creates sculptural installations and photography projects, often using
> found materials and abandoned locations. His artwork has been exhibited
> throughout the United States, Europe, Asia and Australia, including the
> Detroit Institute of Arts, Cranbrook Art Museum, the Museum of Contemporary
> Art Detroit, the University of Michigan, the Smart Museum of Art, the
> School of the Art Institute Chicago, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, the
> Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Museum, the Kunst- Werke Institute, the
> Van Abbemuseum, and the Kunsthalle Wien. He was recently awarded a Kresge
> Artist Fellowship, and his work will be part of upcoming exhibitions at the
> Mattress Factory Art Museum in Pittsburgh and the Museum of Contemporary
> Art Chicago.
>
>
>
> *Owen Mundy* is an artist, designer, and programmer who investigates
> public space and its relationship to data. His artwork highlights
> inconspicuous trends and offers tools to make hackers out of everyday
> users. He has an MFA in Visual Art from the University of California, San
> Diego and is an Assistant Professor of Art at Florida State University.
>
>
>
> *Ebru Yetiskin* studied Radio-TV-Cinema as a bachelor degree in Istanbul
> University. She attended the master program on Science, Technology and
> Society in Istanbul Technical University and Université Louis Pasteur in
> 2001, and she started to work on the interaction between science,
> technology and political economy. She completed the PhD program in
> sociology in Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University in 2008. She conducted the
> preliminary phase of her thesis research in Centre Sociologie de
> L’Innovation in Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Paris as a visiting
> scholar with Bruno Latour and Antoine Hennion. Since 2002, she has been
> working as a researcher in Istanbul Technical University, and teaching
> sociology and media in The Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
> She teaches part-time in Işık University on contemporary arts, new media
> arts, science and technology. She also gave classes in New York University,
> University of Southampton and Inholland University as a visiting scholar.
> She is a member of International Association of Art Critics (AICA) and has
> edited a special volume of *Toplumbilim* on postcolonial thought, which
> is the first edited volume on the subject in Turkey. Since two years, she
> is conducting a research on how to read and write new media art and
> collaborating with new media artists by giving performance lectures,
> workshops and panels in New York, Berlin and Istanbul. Ebru is one of the
> board members of Amber Art and Technology Festival, and curating her first
> exhibition, “Cacophony”, between November 15 – December 31, 2013 in
> açıkekran new media art gallery in Istanbul.
>
>
>
> *Moderators: Selmin Kara (Canada), Patrick Keilty (Canada), Camilla *
> *Møhring* *Reestorff (Denmark)*
>
>
>
> *Selmin Kara* is an Assistant Professor of Film and New Media Studies and
> a co-chair of the colloquium series in media studies and research,
> ProprioMedia, at OCAD University in Toronto. Originally Turkish, she
> received her BA and MA in Istanbul, Turkey, and PhD in Detroit, Michigan.
> She has critical interests in the use of digital technologies, tactical
> media, and sound in documentary as well as post-cinematic aesthetics and
> new materialist approaches in film. Her work has appeared in "Studies in
> Documentary Film" and "Poiesis: A Journal of the Arts & Communication," and
> the "Oxford Handbook of Sound and Image in Digital Media."  Selmin is
> currently co-editing a journal issue on "unruly documentary artivism" and
> working on her monograph “Reassembling Documentary: Sound and Image from
> Actuality to Virtuality,” which proposes a modular and assemblistic
> framework for understanding documentary practices in the age of networks.
>
>
>
> *Patrick Keilty* is Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Information at
> the University of Toronto, and teaches in the Bonham Centre for Sexual
> Diversity Studies there. His writing examines and critiques feminist and
> queer engagements with digital technology, particularly focusing on visual
> culture, database logic, metadata, existential phenomenology, and sexual
> desire. He is co-editor of Feminist and Queer Information Studies Reader.
> His monograph project, provisionally titled Desiring Database Logic:
> Embodiment and Electronic Culture, engages the question of how our embodied
> engagements with labryinthine qualities of database design mediate
> aesthetic objects and structure sexual desire in ways that abound with
> expressive possibilities and new narrative and temporal structures.
>
>
>
> *Camilla **Møhring* *Reestorff* is Assistant Professor in the Department
> of Aesthetics and Communication, Aarhus University and honorary research
> fellow at the Department of Culture and Communication, University of
> Melbourne. She has conducted research on nationalism and the intertwining
> of art, activism and politics in the Danish ‘Culture War’. Her publications
> include work on contemporary cultural politics and political art, e.g. in *Globalizing
> Art. Negotiating Place, Identity and Nation in Contemporary Nordic Art* (Thomsen
> and Ørjasæter 2011), fictionality as a rhetorical strategy (Andersen, Brix,
> Kierkegaard, Skov, Stage and Reestorff 2013) and unruly artivist
> practices, e.g. “Buying Blood Diamonds and Altering Global Capitalism. Mads
> Brügger as Unruly Artivist in *The Ambassador*” (Reestorff 2013). Her
> primary research focus is mediatization, art, artivism and cultural
> participation.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Nov 2, 2013 at 10:50 PM, Renate Ferro <rtf9 at cornell.edu> wrote:
>
>> ----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------
>> We welcome three moderators to -empyre soft-skinned space, Selmin Kara,
>> Patrick Keilty ad Camilla Mehring.  They have rounded up a hearty list of
>> guests this month and we are anticipating a lively discussion, "Documenting
>> Digital Artivism."
>>
>> We first met Patrick and Selmin a couple of summers ago when they
>> attended the School for Criticism and Theory at Cornell.  We are very happy
>> that they have agreed to organize this online discussion spawned from their
>> collective work with Camilla.  Welcome and we look forward to the month.
>> While I list the moderator's biographies below, Patrick will be posting the
>> introduction soon with all of the guests biographies in their entirety.
>>
>> Renate
>>
>> Moderators: Selmin Kara (Canada), Patrick Keilty (Canada), Camilla
>> Møhring Reestorff (Denmark)
>>
>> Selmin Kara is an Assistant Professor of Film and New Media Studies and a
>> co-chair of the colloquium series in media studies and research,
>> ProprioMedia, at OCAD University in Toronto. Originally Turkish, she
>> received her BA and MA in Istanbul, Turkey, and PhD in Detroit, Michigan.
>> She has critical interests in the use of digital technologies, tactical
>> media, and sound in documentary as well as post-cinematic aesthetics and
>> new materialist approaches in film. Her work has appeared in "Studies in
>> Documentary Film" and "Poiesis: A Journal of the Arts & Communication," and
>> the "Oxford Handbook of Sound and Image in Digital Media."  Selmin is
>> currently co-editing a journal issue on "unruly documentary artivism" and
>> working on her monograph “Reassembling Documentary: Sound and Image from
>> Actuality to Virtuality,” which proposes a modular and assemblistic
>> framework for understanding documentary practices in the age of networks.
>>
>>
>>
>> Patrick Keilty is Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Information at
>> the University of Toronto, and teaches in the Bonham Centre for Sexual
>> Diversity Studies there. His writing examines and critiques feminist and
>> queer engagements with digital technology, particularly focusing on visual
>> culture, database logic, metadata, existential phenomenology, and sexual
>> desire. He is co-editor of Feminist and Queer Information Studies Reader.
>> His monograph project, provisionally titled Desiring Database Logic:
>> Embodiment and Electronic Culture, engages the question of how our embodied
>> engagements with labryinthine qualities of database design mediate
>> aesthetic objects and structure sexual desire in ways that abound with
>> expressive possibilities and new narrative and temporal structures.
>>
>>
>>
>> Camilla Møhring Reestorff is Assistant Professor in the Department of
>> Aesthetics and Communication, Aarhus University and honorary research
>> fellow at the Department of Culture and Communication, University of
>> Melbourne. She has conducted research on nationalism and the intertwining
>> of art, activism and politics in the Danish ‘Culture War’. Her publications
>> include work on contemporary cultural politics and political art, e.g. in
>> Globalizing Art. Negotiating Place, Identity and Nation in Contemporary
>> Nordic Art (Thomsen and Ørjasæter 2011), fictionality as a rhetorical
>> strategy (Andersen, Brix, Kierkegaard, Skov, Stage and Reestorff 2013) and
>> unruly artivist practices, e.g. “Buying Blood Diamonds and Altering Global
>> Capitalism. Mads Brügger as Unruly Artivist in The Ambassador” (Reestorff
>> 2013). Her primary research focus is mediatization, art, artivism and
>> cultural participation.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Renate Ferro
>> Visiting Assistant Professor of Art,
>> (contracted since 2004)
>> Cornell University
>> Department of Art, Tjaden Hall Office:  306
>> Ithaca, NY  14853
>> Email:   <rferro at cornell.edu>
>> URL:  http://www.renateferro.net
>>       http://www.privatesecretspubliclies.net
>> Lab:  http://www.tinkerfactory.net
>>
>> Managing Co-moderator of -empyre- soft skinned space
>> http://empyre.library.cornell.edu/
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> empyre forum
>> empyre at lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au
>> http://www.subtle.net/empyre
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Patrick Keilty
> Assistant Professor
> Faculty of Information
> University of Toronto
> @patrickkeilty <https://twitter.com/PatrickKeilty>
>



-- 
Patrick Keilty
Assistant Professor
Faculty of Information
University of Toronto
@patrickkeilty <https://twitter.com/PatrickKeilty>
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