[-empyre-] start of week 3

Andra McCartney andrasound at gmail.com
Tue Jun 17 04:44:30 EST 2014


hi Jim and others,

I wanted to comment on this:
" At a recent conference in London, I heard David Toop suggest that curating a group sound art exhibition was "impossible" given the inevitable sonic conflict between the exhibited works. Such a claim, on its face, seems rather provocative. What are some strategies that curators or artists might employ to overcome the obvious challenges Toop is alluding to?"

My friend Diane Leboeuf does sound installations for museums that involve doing separate installations for different parts of the exhibit, and making them fit together sonically. This is perhaps easier for her to do because as the sole maker, she can avoid conflict between the different parts of the exhibits. When different people are making pieces, it is more of a challenge. But what would happen if a curator approached a number of sound artists and asked them to make works that would NOT conflict with each other, that would collaborate sonically in creating an integrated exhibition, with elements by different people, but where the people would attempt to make the works fit together, by choosing different frequency ranges, sound placement and timbral characters? It would certainly be a different approach to sound ecology, to ask the makers to work in concert rather than in conflict?
Andra

On 2014-06-16, at 9:28 AM, Jim Drobnick wrote:

>  At a recent conference in London, I heard David Toop suggest that curating a group sound art exhibition was "impossible" given the inevitable sonic conflict between the exhibited works. Such a claim, on its face, seems rather provocative. What are some strategies that curators or artists might employ to overcome the obvious challenges Toop is alluding to?

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